5 Ways to Achieve Snapchat Success in 5 Days

Adam Noakes Content

snapchat croud australia blog

I recently decided to create a new Snapchat account. I’d been here before, with a personal account – but my circle of friends didn’t adopt the platform quite as quick as I did, and my personal interest in Snapchat somewhat faded. Whilst I’ve stayed in the know of what Snapchat can do for clients, my hands-on personal experience was in need of attention.

I’d more or less neglected Snapchat until this year, when a pet project of mine started to gain momentum and with it a bit of a following on social media.

Then someone on Twitter said to me, “You should get on Snapchat”.

As a marketeer in my early (very early) thirties, having been around the block a bit, Snapchat was the only large social media platform I hadn’t engaged with. So I decided to delve back in and launch my own project on Snapchat – with full encouragement from the social media team at Croud.

Granted, I had a head start, working with Snapchat for clients, and having the social media team in my ear about it. In any case, you can’t beat hands-on, personal experience.

It only took five days back on Snapchat to learn five key lessons:

1. Use other social media channels to promote your Snapchat

It’s not easy to get people to add you on Snapchat. It’s not as simple as following a bunch of users, as the process is a manual, and in social media terms, lengthy one. You have to leverage your following on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to attract friends on Snapchat.

The easiest way to do this is simply to promote your Snapchat account. How? Firstly get a screenshot of your Snapcode or download direct from the web, which you can edit with your logo or Image of preference. Tweet this out to your followers, post it up on Facebook and Instagram. It’s the quickest way to get the word out, and if you have a decent following elsewhere, your audience will grow.

Harley  Davidson Snapchat image
2. Video content is key

When I first joined Snapchat soon after it launched, most of what I consumed was imagery. Fast forward to today, and everyone I see on Snapchat is sharing video. It’s 70 per cent of the content I’ve consumed since setting up an account for my project. Brands are using video to good effect in Snapchat too, both via ads and organic content.

Nike ID’s Australia launch has a Snapchat video ad, which was nestled neatly In-between Vice’s content whilst I was flicking through their story yesterday.

3.Make use of Snapchat filters and stickers

At first, you might be somewhat reluctant to use the wealth of different filters and stickers you can add to your Snap. You’ll soon need to get over that and go with the flow. Everyone does it, and nearly every still image I see has a sticker or at least text overlay of some kind. It’s a testament to using the platform specific features – no matter how crazy some of them might be.

I’m not saying brand managers should start posting questionable selfies, using these filters (see below) – but there’s plenty of ways to use the functions of Snapchat to bring your Imagery and video to life.

Stickers overlaying on your images is this easiest way to achieve this. There’s a massive range of emoji and meme style graphics and text at your disposal. Think about what your audience wants, and take a look at how your target demographic is using these stickers in their day to day chat. While you don’t want to steal any content from your fans (without giving credit), you can certainly use your own audience as inspiration.

snapchat filter croud australia

4. Make it personal.

Snapchat is a really personal platform—possibly the most personal out of all the Big Four. As a brand you need to be as human as you can be on Snapchat. WWE put Snapchat in the hands of their fans, or a certain Superstar—so you can see the WWE through their eyes. This enables friends of WWE on Snapchat to see an event from a backstage point of view, or as the crowd sees it all unfold. This “insider” approach is a very smart way of getting more people to experience your brand.

You might even want to send Snaps direct to your audience, as a response to a snap they have sent you – or as part of a wider engagement Incentive. Don’t be afraid to do this from time to time; it’s particularly effective for surprise and delight executions.

If you’re afraid of getting personal, or humanising your brand, Snapchat isn’t going to work

5. Have fun with it.

The biggest thing I’ve learned is to have fun. Snapchat is no doubt a powerful, cutting-edge method of social communication – but it’s also really fun. Don’t lose sight of that as a brand, and keep in mind this when even thinking of venturing onto the platform that is now used by more people that Twitter.

I’ve had some really random things happen on Snapchat, and given my audience is 95% male, aged 34 – 54, I’ve had a surprising amount of engagement and Interaction on the platform.

Fun is the best way to describe Snapchat. It’s the founding principle of the platform, and that’s reflected in the demographic of the user base and the content brands choose to share.

If you are serious about social media, and targeting millennials – Snapchat is a must.

For memorable, perfectly curated digital content and social media promotion, get in touch with the team at Croud Australia.